Etsy listing available in my shop

Check out this item in my Etsy shop https://www.etsy.com/listing/464231209/bunk-beds-the-heavy-duty-series

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Practice, practice, practice

The saying goes, “Practice makes perfect”.  Well, my hand tool skills are far from perfect, but I have been practicing.  My wife wanted me to build her and her sister a screen door frame with hardware cloth, or chicken wire covering the middle.  It is going to be used to display handmade necklaces and jewelry, hair bows, hair bow holders, and various other items that need vertical display space at craft and yard sales. 
So I dug out some rough sawn poplar from my Dad’s sawmill, I’ll post on that a little later, and started getting it prepped.  I did use power tools to get it sized and ripped to width.  After that I turned to hand tools to cut the four bridle joints.  This was my first set of bridle joints.  I’ve watched other people make them, Roy Underhill, Chris Swartz, Jim Tolpin, but these were all mine.  It took me a moment to figure out my methodology to cut the joints.  Boy, it is alot harder than any of those guys made it look.  However, by the fourth one I was getting alot better and more efficient. They still looked like I cut them with a chainsaw, but improvement was evident. 
After I got the joints cut and everything dry assembled, I made a rash decision and decided to nail it together.  I know, blasphemy.  Cut all those joints and then turn to nails.  I can remember my Grandaddy cutting bridle joints for field gates and nailing them together.  He always said that the glue wood eventually fail out in the weather and you would have to nail them anyways.  I even clinched the nails on the backside.  A technique I thought was lost until I ran across a Youtube video recently from The English Woodworker.
All in all I’m happy with the results even if they are a little crude.

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Practice, practice, practice

The saying goes, “Practice makes perfect”.  Well, my hand tool skills are far from perfect, but I have been practicing.  My wife wanted me to build her and her sister a screen door frame with hardware cloth, or chicken wire covering the middle.  It is going to be used to display handmade necklaces and jewelry, hair bows, hair bow holders, and various other items that need vertical display space at craft and yard sales. 
So I dug out some rough sawn poplar from my Dad’s sawmill, I’ll post on that a little later, and started getting it prepped.  I did use power tools to get it sized and ripped to width.  After that I turned to hand tools to cut the four bridle joints.  This was my first set of bridle joints.  I’ve watched other people make them, Roy Underhill, Chris Swartz, Jim Tolpin, but these were all mine.  It took me a moment to figure out my methodology to cut the joints.  Boy, it is alot harder than any of those guys made it look.  However, by the fourth one I was getting alot better and more efficient. They still looked like I cut them with a chainsaw, but improvement was evident. 
After I got the joints cut and everything dry assembled, I made a rash decision and decided to nail it together.  I know, blasphemy.  Cut all those joints and then turn to nails.  I can remember my Grandaddy cutting bridle joints for field gates and nailing them together.  He always said that the glue wood eventually fail out in the weather and you would have to nail the anyways.  I even clinched the nails on the backside.  A technique I thought was lost until I ran across a Youtube video recently from The English Woodworker.
All in all I’m happy with the results even if they are a little crude.

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Weekend Sawbench

Pretty cool little bench. Gives me some inspiration for building myself one.

Paleotool's Weblog

A Saw horse or a full-size workbench, for Hobbits?

Baumeister_-_Holzschnitt_von_Jost_Amman_-_1536.svgLiving where I do, without a proper workshop, I have moved to a more portable setup.  Along with this, I have pared down by letting go a number of cumbersome tools.  However, a flat, solid surface is sorely missed.

shaving-horse A less messy version of my current shop.

I find myself working on the seat of the shave-horse or on top of saw horses quite a bit with my small table-saw serving as a layout table (when the project is small enough).  And yes, I do miss the full-size table saw for ripping long boards.

75-Amb-2-317-21-r.tif Here’s a recent photo of me in my make-shift workshop.

A little over a year ago I began scheming for a small, pre-industrial-style setup.  Something an itinerant carpenter or bodger would be likely to use.  It needed to be easy to move and store but provide a…

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Rainy Night

I had a chance to steal away about 90 minutes of shop time tonight. The pouring rain on the tin roof of my shop was quite contenting.  Instead of firing up all the loud saws and machinery, I decided to tune-up a couple of my planes and do a little hand work tonight.

The first plane I tuned was my Shelton No.5 jackplane.  I inherited this plane many years ago and it sat unused for sometime. I finally took the time to properly clean and recondition this plane for use.  Tonight all it needed was a little cleaning, a touch-up on the oilstone, and some fresh wax to protect it from rust. This is my favorite plane.  It cuts so easily and makes wonderful shavings, and it is versatile.  I can take rough shavings to rough down sawn lumber or super fine shavings to bring the surface ready for finish.

The next plane is a little Stanley block plane I bought off of eBay almost three years ago for $3.00.  Cleaned it, sharpened it, and put it to work.  Tonight all it needed was a little wax on the sole and it was ready.

I started getting some pieces ready for a display that I’m building for my wife.  I cut the pieces to length, planed the edges square, and laid out for the sockets of the bridle joints.  Overall not bad for a rainy nightplanetuneup